165 Lilly Rd NE, Suite B, Olympia • 360.455-8014

herniated disc

Physical therapy- will it hurt?

People often wonder, if I go to physical therapy will it hurt?  Sometimes I’ve heard people say “PT” stands for “pain and torture.”

So, does physical therapy hurt?  This is the good news:  most of the time the answer is NO!

When will physical therapy hurt?   Once in a while the answer is yes, BUT that is because of the surgery you have had and the steps that you need to go through to get past the normal side effects of having a surgery.  What surgeries will be more painful to rehabilitate from?  In my experience as a physical therapist, new knee replacements seem to be the most painful.  Second to that is shoulder surgery.   The worse pain is usually there for a while only then gets better as you recover and move more, usually within a few weeks to a month.

When should physical therapy be comfortable?  Most of the time physical therapy should be comfortable and make you feel better as each treatment progresses.  The old adage of “no pain no gain” does NOT apply.  When you have an injury, working weak muscles until they are tired will be a good limit of exercise;  if you push past the muscle you are working feeling tired (heavy and achey)  you might cause more pain because your body is working in its weak zone and that is when more pain happens.

Will there be soreness after my physical therapy session?  It is pretty common for patients to feel sore after their PT appointment, especially your first visit because we have to have you move a lot to fully evaluate your problem.  Sometimes after introducing a new exercise, or increasing resistance you will be sore too.  You should not be in pain, however and if your soreness is there for more than 1-2 days, speak up on your next PT session because that is too long.

Most of the time physical therapy should be comfortable and leave you feeling good!

 

 

 

 

 

Back Pain runs in families!

I am often asked as a physical therapist, "Do herniated discs run in families?" I often respond that I don't know, but it seems that way.

Well, now we know!  It does run in families, and people who have a cousin or grandparent who have had a herniated disc have an increased chance, according to this article:

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/07/back-pain-runs-in-families/?ref=health

What does that mean for YOU if you have relative with back pain?  

  • keep in good physical condition overall and exercise regularly
  • keep your core muscles firing correctly and your MusclesInSync
  • make sure to squat to pick up things from the floor
  • step out and lunge with your forward leg if you have to reach (such as vacumning) and avoid bending at the back with your legs together