165 Lilly Rd NE, Suite B, Olympia • 360.455-8014

Rehabilitation

Do physical therapists get along with chiropractors?

There are myths out there about physical therapists and physical therapy.  One of them is “physical therapists do not get along with chiropractors.”

Here is a link that highlights the myth:  http://physicaltherapy.about.com/od/typesofphysicaltherapy/a/Physical-Therapy-Mythbusters.htm

The truth is…in my experience chiropractors and physical therapists get along great and even refer to one another for the best interests of  the patient.   Physical therapists are really great at specific exercises that are customized to fix your precise problem,  and chiropractors can manipulate your specific joint to get the pain down quickly.

Together, you feel better quickly and have long term results if you continue your specific exercise program.

Patients get the best of both worlds when there is teamwork between the professions.  Add into the mix a great massage therapist and you’ve got a powerful mix that get people better.

Pelvic Health Physical Therapy–Physical Therapy treats WHAT?

Okay, today we are discussing a very sensitive issue–Pelvic Health Physical Therapy. Having pelvic health issues can be intimidating–because, it is soooo personal. You may be wondering, what issues do people suffer that have poor pelvic health?

Lots of problems can happen down south. There are muscles in the pelvic floor (the levator ani aka pelvic floor muscles or PF) PF muscles can spasm or become weak, just like shoulder muscles, or any other muscle groups. The difference with these muscles causing problems, however, is that spasms here can cause other problems with how the pelvic organs function. Stress incontinence (leakage when you lift, cough, sneeze, run) can happen, often in women but also in men who have had prostate cancer surgery, from weakness.

Levator ani muscles, otherwise know as Pelvic Floor muscles

Levator ani muscles, otherwise know as Pelvic Floor muscles

Urge and frequency incontinence happens when the bladder muscles decide it is time for your bladder to let go, even if You don’t think it is time, and then… you leak. Medicine can be helpful for urgency and frequency, but they leave you with dry mouth side effects.

These muscles can also spasm causing a lot of pain and difficulty with fully emptying your bladder.

A lot of other pelvic health conditions can be treated by pelvic floor physical therapy…more tomorrow

Incontinence Therapy can restore endurance, and confidence

Do you have a small amount of urinary leakage when you cough or sneeze? Do you have a really strong urge to go to the restroom when you get home and put your key in the door? Do you wonder where you will be in 5 years with this condition?
There is a solution! Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy addresses incontinence by addressing how the muscles in the pelvic floor work, just like physical therapy addresses muscles that don’t work in your knee or shoulder. Comstock Physical Therapist has two female therapists who already treat this condition, Joyce Mills MPT, OCS and Linnea Comstock PT OCS MPA. This month we are adding a third therapist, Lori Waterman PT, DPT, OCS who specializes in this, too.
“What is the physical therapy treatment like for this condition,” you may wonder. If you have leakage, from weakness, such as coughing, sneezing, the physical therapist will check the muscles for movement and strength in a private room. This is usually done with a biofeedback unit that reads the muscle activity, telling the therapist how much strength and endurance the muscle has (or doesn’t have). After your strength and endurance baseline is established, the therapist will set you up on an exercise program and will have you come back for weekly updates to progress your strength and endurance.
A different problem happens when you don’t leak when cough or sneeze but you have leakage when you get home and put your key in the door, you have urge incontinence. Urge incontinence is fixed by retraining your bladder to hold until later. Physical therapy can help you fix this too, by teaching you the tools to retrain your bladder.
Sometimes you can have “mixed incontinence” which is having BOTH conditions, physical therapy can help both together.
The good news is with some work and effort, THIS CAN BE HELPED!

Baseball player gets whiplash! What should he do?

Baseball whiplashBaseball whiplash

 

This video is an extreme example of whiplash, and it gets you thinking, what is the science about whiplash?

 

IMG_8402 ▶ Jonathan Villar Slides into Brandon Phillips Butt – hilarious Butt-slide of the year

 

Mr. Villar's large neck muscles will go into spasm to protect him.  The two muscles which will spasm the most are the sternocleidomastoid and scalenes. 

scmscalenes

When sternocleidomastoid spasms you suffer from headaches.  When scalenes spasm you suffer from arm tingling and numbness.  Mr. Villars will have both.  What should he do to relieve his pain? 

1)  get physical therapy for stretches for sternocleidomastoid and scalenes, and for myofascial release, and

2)  start working the "core" of the neck, the longus colli–(which is put out of commission by the whiplash) 
Longus_colli

If he does both of these, his neck will probably fully recover!

Muscle of the Week: Peroneus Longus pain masking as plantarfasciitis

The peroneus muscles are on the outside of the lower leg and ankle and usually get strained when the ankle gets sprained.  This makes sense to most people because the tendons run so close to the outside of the ankle. 

 

But…..the peroneus longus tendon crosses UNDER the foot after running along side the ankle bone to help support the arch.  It attaches in the middle of the arch on the bottom side. 

Here is  a picture of the bottom of the foot:

When the peroneus longus tendon insertion starts to pull and get irritated, it can feel like plantarfasciitis and be confusing.  However, the fix is usually the same, stretch your Achilles and plantarfascia and strengthen the side to side  muscles as well as get manual therapy. Sometimes orthotics help too.  Your physical therapist is particularly well trained to fix this condition.